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20120930
20121008
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
that that dollar is wisely spent. i think they stand for civil rights. i know they're all for education in science and training, which i strongly support. they want these young people to have a chance to get jobs and the rest. i think the business community wants to get involved. i think they're asking for new and creative ways to try to reach it with everyone involved. i think that's part of it. i think also that the american people want a balanced program that gives us long-term growth so that they're not having to take money that's desperate to themselves and their families and give it to someone else. i'm opposed to that, too. >> and now it is time for our rebuttal for this period. mr. president? >> yes. the connection that's been made again between the deficit and the interest rates -- there is no connection between them. there is a connection between interest rates and inflation, but i would call to your attention that in 1981 while we were operating still on the carter-mondale budget that we inherited -- that the interest rates came down from 211/2, down toward the 12 or 13 figure. and whil
science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations he has for himself. but look, i think part of that was because as i said earlier, we met a new mitt romney, we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan, which was his tax cut. i don't have a tax plan that is 4.8 trillion, i am not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a voucher plan, i love teachers, i think we need more of them. don't believe me, speaker gingrich was eloquent in the primaries, saying that mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> the president had 90 minutes, now, if he had done his homework and prepared, if he had actually studied romney, why didn't he say it? virtually every analyst has said, and even your deputy campaign manager has said the charges -- was made wrong. forgetting that for a second, the job of the president is supposed to be able to be competent and to stand up for what he believes in and articulate what is wrong. mitt romney walked over him. >> and alex, you mentioned the president is air born to the golden s
want their children educated. they want to get our edge back in science, and they want a policy headed by the president that helps close this gap that's widening between the united states and europe and japan. the american people want to keep opening doors. they want those civil rights laws enforced. they want the equal rights amendment ratified. they want equal pay for comparable effort for women. and they want it because they've understood from the beginning that when we open doors, we're all stronger, just as we were at the olympics. i think as you make the case, the american people will increasingly come to our cause. >> mr. mondale, isn't it possible that the american people have heard your message -- and they are listening -- but they are rejecting it? >> well, tonight we had the first debate over the deficit. the president says it'll disappear automatically. i've said it's going to take some work. i think the american people will draw their own conclusions. secondly, i've said that i will not support the cuts in social security and medicare and the rest that the president has pr
, weekend, home, science which were controversial but magnets for advertising. he created a national edition, bought up other newspapers and magazines and television stations. by the time he stepped down in 1997, the company was bringing in more than $2.5 billion in revenue. he was tough when he needed to be, facing down the nixon administration by publishing the secret penalty gone papers on the vietnam war and faced criticism from his own profession after giving an op-ed to welcome sapphire who went onto win a pulitzer. his son now runs the paper and company. he was 86. media monitor is next. >>> time for the media monitor. a look at the hits and errors in the news business. >>> roger simon got attention for his political column this week because he had paul ryan reportedly using a toxic nickname for his running mate, let ryan be ryan and let the stench be the stench. suddenly you could smell that story in lots of places. >> yes. the stench. that is what paul ryan is actually calling mitt romney according to politico. >> "the new york times" columnist blogged this is bad behavior, you're s
there in the future. science, technology, and space offering technology to everybody, all the you -- all of the young ones coming up. ronald reagan is clearly the strongest leader of the free world. i will be honest with you. it is a joy to serve with a president who does not apologize for the united states of america. mr. mondale on the other hand has one idea. go out and tax the american people. he wants to wipe out the one protection that those of the lowest end of the economic scale have protecting them against being rammed into higher and higher tax brackets. we owe our country too much to go back to that kind of an approach. i would like to say something to the young people. i know what it is to have a dream and to have a job and to work hard to really participate and to the american dream. some of your finishing high school and college, some of your starting off in the workplace. we want america oppose the greatest grift -- america's greatest griffeift. it is absolutely essential that we guarantee the young people that the they will not know the agony of war. gift, opportunity and peace. we mu
have trained more than 1,000 math and science teachers. we needed that. we want to recruit these folks to our community colleges. we know we can create two million american workers and give them the skills for the high-tech manufacturing companies in the future. there are 600,000 jobs in america in tech today. that is why we paired up with community colleges, creating thousands and thousands of decent paying jobs, but they oppose it. [applause] we are not only going to continue to provides grants and tuition for after high school education, but we are going to cut the growth of college tuition in half. [cheers and applause] we have already reduced the deficit. in four years, we will reduce it by another $1 trillion. there is an easy way to do this. we have to make some difficult decisions. we have to ask the very wealthy to pay more. ladies and gentlemen, we are going to end the war in afghanistan as we did in iraq. [cheers and applause] and in the process, over the next decade, save over $800 million. we're going to come home with that money and put half of it down to reduce the debt
, that is a really great question, and that's really sort of a gun is as much political science as anything else. i think a big, a big factor is am i know, i don't want to sound too earthly about this, but the rise of computer redistricting strangely enough, that the members of congress, state legislatures have created congressional seats in the house of representatives that are all democratic or all republican. that are relatively few swing states. we've seen a bunch of change in the past couple of election, but that's very much been the exception rather than the rule. so minutes of the house of representatives fear primaries more than they fear generate elections by and large. and does they gravitate towards the margins of their parties. that doesn't fully explain the senate, because you can't redistrict the senate, but it is had and he knows impact at the state, state legislature level and the more polarized politics. we have also i think the news media plays a role in this. it used to be that there was a kind of shared set of assumptions and news, everybody watched walter cronkite or huntley an
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ...and we inspected his brakes for free. -free is good. -free is very good. [ male announcer ] now get 50% off brake pads and shoes at meineke. >>> all right. time now for the "ridiculist." tonight, we're adding all the nonbelievers out there. in case you don't know any 12-year-old girls a believer is what the kids called the super fans of pop star justin bieber. you have the non-beliebers on the "ridiculist." even if you're not familiar with his music, you think music should be in quotation marks when it refers to what he does, you got to admit that young man has one heck of a work ethic. so much so, in fact, that even if he barfs onstage in the middle of a concert, he just keeps on going. >> yeah. he just leaned right over and hurled onstage right in the middle of a song but do you think a little bit of vomit can stop the tiny juggernaut that is justin bieber? no. he just kept on going. later that night, he tweeted this. quote, great show, getting
years from 2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. prior to starting that he led the project for the republican future. he also served as chief of staff to vice president quayle and secretary of education bill bennett. he also served as foreign policy adviser to senator john mccain. i'm sure all of you see built regularly on "fox news sunday" and the fox news channel. i actually met bill in 1981 when he was a very young, assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. it's been great to see all the things he has accomplished since that time. so the questions i'd like to pose for each of you come and i'll start with governor huntsman, what does the 2012 election reveal about the respected leadership styles of obama and romney? >> probably not much at this point. >> well, this panel is over. [laughter] >>
math and science teachers. part of his plan, i imagine welcome news to educators around the country. >> i think president obama's had a lot of great things about education. of course, he's been saying it for a long time. the importance from early childhood to graduating, increase the pell grants, change the loan programs so money doesn't go to the bank. it goes to kids to give them an opportunity to go to college. save 400,000 education jobs which keeps class size down. what amazed me most about the debate was i watched mitt romney, the master of etch-a-sketch. i mean will the real mitt romney please stand up? when i listen to him talk about education, i thought who is this guy? as governor, he cut education funding. they had teacher layoffs. he drove college class up immensely. he had tax breaks to the wealthiest. he supports the ryan budget which, if that goes through there will be $115 billion cut from education. he supports vouchers for private schools. he thinks kids should have all of the educa
the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers we are now $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration we have a policy to get a great education and then get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h-1b issues that are so vital for our future strength. fourth, the rules for incentivizing risk-taking and preventing recklessness. i don't think that we have in any way remedied that the way we want and on the government funded research if it looks like an ekg heading for a heart attack. i don't know if they are relative to what. all i know is in the things that have historically made us great, on each one of those i see us not g
was astonished to find that akin's sits on the science committee and he fails to understand 8th grade biology. it illustrates t point that we have 535 people to regulate everything but produce thing. we really need to step back and understand that his views and the views of an individual shouldn't be regulated by the government. he speaks for smaller government, yet he wants to push govnment morality on other individuals because they choose a different way of life. as your senator, i think the issues of abortion are really a wedge issue to take away and distract from the important issues like balancing the budgets and ending the wars and destroying your personal freedom. step back and take a look at the important issues. >> congressman akin, there were several characterizations of your position there. would oatlikoffer a chance of rebuttal? >> there were a few words ere. let's start with a couple really basic things. if you don't believe the federal government should do everything, it doesn't mean you don't believe in it. the question do you want the federal governmt to take over everything t
. there is some corals that live for many thousands of yeernz we found through some of the science we do we can drill holes down to the center of the corals and look at annual growth rings and we can look at when, in fact, when the first agriculture in australia happened, we saw a change in the type of chemistry that the annual growth rings and coral were depositing. so we have seen a chronology of increased siltation, of increased fertilization, of
as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bart is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership is part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. william kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. purchaser is not view of the project for the republican future. he also served as chief of staff to vice president quayle and secretary of education, bill bennett. he also served to john mccain. all of these t-bill regularly on fox news sunday in the fox news channel. i actually met ellen 1981 when he was a very young assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. it's been great to see all the things he's accomplished since that time. so the question i would like to pose for each of you, and i'll start with governor huntsman. what does the 2012 election reveal about the respective leadership styles of obama and romney? >> probably not much. >> okay, what this panel -- >> see you later. >> you can extrapolate a few things from president obama's first term that might be instructive. he isn't
to lead us in an all- out search to advance our education, our learning, and our science and training, because this world is more complex and we're being pressed harder all the time. i believe in opening doors. we won the olympics, in part, because we've had civil rights laws and the laws that prohibit discrimination against women. i have been for those efforts all my life. the president's record is quite different. the question is our future. president kennedy once said in response to similar arguments, "we are great, but we can be greater.'' we can be better if we face our future, rejoice in our strengths, face our problems, and by solving them, build a better society for our children. thank you. >> thank you, mr. mondale. [applause] please, we have not finished quite yet. thank you, mr. mondale, and thank you, mr. president. and our thanks to our panel members, as well. and so we bring to a close this first of the league of women voters presidential debates of 1984. you two can go at each again in the final league debate on october 21st, in kansas city, missouri. and this thursday
is in sarasota high school. her science class was supposed to be for 24 students. she's the 36th student in that classroom. they sent me a picture of her in the classroom. they can't squeeze another desk in for her, so she has to stand during class. i want the federal government, consistent with local control and new accountability, to make improvement of our schools the number one priority so caley will have a desk and can sit down in a classroom where she can learn. >> all right. so having heard the two of you, the voters have just heard the two of you, what is the difference? what is the choice between the two of you on education? >> the first is, the difference is there is no new accountability measures in vice president gore's plan. he says he's for voluntary testing. you can't have voluntary testing. you must have mandatory testing. you must say that if you receive money you must show us whether or not children are learning to read and write and add and subtract. that's the difference. you may claim you've got mandatory testing but you don't, mr. vice president. that's a huge diffe
. there's no science to that, but when you see the explosion of smart phones they think they could be related. >> clayton: drowning deaths in fact, many parents busy at the pool, and not paying attention, deaths due to drowning and detrimental to see the kids on the smart phone when are' not with them and present, and psychologically. >> alisyn: that part is true, i try to put it away at home and at home, but our playground, oh. >> dave: well, hopefully you're not all-- give us good stories of times you may have been buried in the phone, not grim things, but something silly may have happened, a bump and a bruise, something like that e we'll talk about it later on the show. >> alisyn: to your headlines because new hope for families of victims of 9/11. the new york post reports the city forensic scientists will use a new tool to try to identify new remains, can take dna from bone fragments and identify person's eye and skin color. that's incredible. right now can only determine the sex. 1,120 remains still have not been identified. experts hope that soon they will be able to narrow d
to push the boundaries of science and technology so are innovators and entrepreneurs can start these companies. to think about that as a form of success, in education, roughly 30% of high-school students drop out. we used to leave the world in high school graduates. we no longer. on infrastructure, we are $2 trillion in the deficit in terms of the infrastructure. on immigration, we have a policy where we give you a great education and then get the hell out. 1b're still fighting simple h visa issues. i do not think we have in any way remedied this. on government-funded research, it looks like any cagy headed to -- ekg heading to a heart attack. on each one of those indices that has made as great, i see is not going in the direction that we should be. for me, that is the alarm bell and the peptalk have been trying to put forth. >> i will ask the same question to you. are we a strong as we have ever been or are there ways you see a measurable in meaningful decline? >> to me, it's obvious we're not as strong as we have ever been for the reasons that tom has just enumerated but also
in political science 101, should be elected representative do what he believes is right or with a constituent thinks is right? you could give to the question one way or another. the important thing to take away from that is there is tension between the elected representative wants to do and what the constituent wants to do. no one wants to run from office so they can cast a lever from what the constituents to do. you want to be a candidate because you believe in something. nobody wants to just pull the lever for what the constituents want to do. all a super pak really can do is identify places where the election representative has gone out too far from the constituency and educate the electorate about how the elected representative is sideways with the public opinion of the people. take that advertisements the crossroads ran and were running in the states talking about how the president passed a stimulus program. the stimulus was widely -- wildly unpopular. all they can do is hold the president or another elected official and account for what they did. it cannot change public opinion about st
at science history, cyber world, popular culture and computer networking in politics. live at noon eastern on book tv on c-span2. >> next a symposium on partisan politics and compromise. this hour and a half event is hosted by the university of southern california schwarzenegger's institute for state and global policy. panelists include senator john mccain and former senator tom daschle. >> we all breathe the same air. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the chairman of the institute and the inaugural holder of the governor downey chair professor of state and global policy at u.s.e., governor arnold schwarzenegger. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you very much. thank you very much for the fantastic introduction. that's exactly the way i wrote it. [laughter] also thank you very much for your great partnership. one thing i wanted to correct what you said today is i did not win miss universe. different bikinis, waxing, all of those things i did not win that competition. it's mr. universe. anyway, i want to say how enthusiastic i am about being in partnership with u.s.c. the preside
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)